The House Center for Pediatric Hearing Health Research is committed to furthering our understanding of the effects of pediatric hearing loss on development and improving interventions and access for children and adolescents with hearing loss.

About Pediatric Hearing Health 

Hearing loss is a condition that affects individuals of all ages, including an estimated 3-5% of children and adolescents in the United States. While hearing aids and cochlear implants can improve a child’s hearing and access to speech, these devices are not always available to children who may need them due to various barriers, including cost, absence of accessible care, and lack of information about treatment options. Furthermore, even well-programmed hearing devices that are fitted early are not able to restore typical hearing for children with hearing loss. Because hearing plays an important role in spoken language development, children with hearing loss who do and do not use hearing devices are at risk for difficulties in certain aspects of everyday communication.

Areas of Research

Located within the new House Children’s Hearing Center, the Center for Pediatric Hearing Health Research actively collaborates with clinicians and partner institutions to better understand the effects of pediatric hearing loss on long-term development and improve interventions for children and adolescents with hearing loss. We are committed to leveraging a wide range of methods and technologies toward cutting-edge research on pediatric hearing health.

Hearing Loss and Challenging Listening Conditions

Ongoing studies at the Center examine how hearing loss affects children’s ability to use and understand speech under challenging conditions. Current areas of interest include speech recognition in background noise, listening-related fatigue, and spoken emotion communication. Researchers at the Center also use eye-tracking technology to characterize the efficiency with which children process speech under various listening conditions. Findings from these studies will help to identify specific communication skills that can be particularly difficult for children with hearing loss, as well as how audiologic, language, and educational interventions may support the development of these skills.

Longitudinal Trends in Auditory Development

Another focus of the Center for Pediatric Hearing Health Research is to identify longitudinal trends in auditory development among children with hearing loss. In partnership with clinicians at the House Children’s Hearing Center, our researchers are compiling standardized clinical data to better characterize the long-term effects of clinical interventions, family factors, and individual child characteristics on communication outcomes.

Hearing Healthcare Access

In collaboration with community partners, the Center for Pediatric Hearing Health Research team is working to identify disparities in hearing healthcare access and awareness in rural communities. The ultimate goals of this line of research are to ensure that all families have access to appropriate and timely hearing healthcare, and to empower families in making informed decisions about the intervention options that best meet the needs of their children.

Our Team

Gregory P. Lekovic

Monita Chatterjee 

PhD

John W Headshot

Qian-Jie Fu

MD

John J. Galvin III

John Galvin

PhD

John J. Galvin III

Kelsey Klein

PhD

John J. Galvin III

Sean Lang

Clinical Research Coordinator II

Dr. Peng

Srikanta Mishra

MD

Dr. Peng

Kevin Peng

MD

John J. Galvin III

William Slattery

MD

Contact Our Pediatric Hearing Health Research Team:

John J. Galvin III
Kelsey Klein, PhD

Pediatric Hearing Health Research Scientist
KKlein@hifla.org

John J. Galvin III
Sean Lang

Clinical Research Coordinator II
slang@hifla.org

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